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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
him. pretty impressive. does he have to pay the baggage fees? >> he told npr he used to be so scared of flying he couldn't get on a plane, now he can't get off a plane. >>> now, next on this monday -- a boy falls 40 feet down a well and his dad springs into action. >> it ends all well. >>> is it one of the greatest soccer matches ever? a huge comeback for team usa. >> fantastic match. >>> what a cleaning crew found onboard on a plane shocked even the tsa. we'll explain coming up. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. and celebrex is not a narcotic. when it comes to relieving your arthrit
npr can function just fine on its own. that would be nearly $1 billion a year, $10 billion over a decade, if we just cut out those two programs. there many places we could cut that we're spending on programs that we do not need, wasteful programs. when the gao cn find $200 billion in cuts, that a significant. host: in your view, what is the proper role of government? guest: xiii, the government is ordained by god. punish those who do evil and reward those which is right. the government should be maintaining law and order and to be fostering a society in which exemplary behavior is rewarded and less than exemplary behavior is not. and there's a moral symmetry to the society. i think government and the country as wealthy as ours, we should be looking out for the welfare and health of the people within the ability of the government and the ability of the country to pay we cannot do everything. that is part of the problem. washington has been tried to do everything. they have been kicking the can down the road. now we've reached the place we can no longer can get down the road. we'r
. >> lehrer: we get the latest on new clashes in syria from npr's deborah amos in damascus. >> the president wants to have a national dialogue, he says on july 10th. this group says nada, we are not your partners until the violence stops on the streets. >> brown: paul solman talks to the authors of a provocative new book on how fannie mae's push- for-profits helped pump up the housing bubble. >> if you are trying to enrich yourself, increase your profits, which fannie mae was absolutely determined to do then that becomes a per version of home ownership. >> lehrer: mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it'
down the drain. thanks to npr we know about loads of unused spare change piling up as the nation stares down its debt. abc's jon karl explains. >> reporter: we took a journey to the u.s. mint in philadelphia for a lesson in how the government is losing money by making money. this is the presidential dollar coin. congress ordered the mint to make millions of them to honor every dead president but nobody seems to want them. they cost 32 cents a pop to make. the mint makes nearly 2 million of them every day. do the math. about 600,000 dollars a day to make them. because almost nobody uses these things, most go directly into storage. we found a bunch of them 100 miles down the road in a vault. here at the federal reserve in baltimore, the coins are packed into plastic bags stacked one on top of each other all the way up and down this aisle several aisles of them, millions and millions of dollars in presidential coins. federal reserve says they are piling up so quickly they are spending $650,000 to build a new vault in dallas to hold them. shipping the coins there will cost another $3 millio
at npr. skip over our speaker for a moment, over the podium as well, melissa sharp with new silk media. she is our fantastic speakers committee chair. skip over our second speaker for a moment, the key to seem to press secretary with the natural resources defense council. also the organizer of today's event. we thank you for that, bob. we are told that it is a vote and we are awaiting another guest of the speaker, congressman brad miller of north carolina. then moving on down, andrea stone, correspondent for "huffington post." glow is washington director of reporters without borders and a vital member of our press freedom member and al isley is editor at large who tells me been blogging for "huffington post" since day one. now please a large amount of applause for everyone. [applause] >> if there were a king and queen of online journalism, our headline to a guest speakers could be considered candidates for members of the royal family. when tim armstrong and arianna huffington announced aol's purchase of "huffington post" in february it marked not just yet another reshaping of aol but a
. host: npr has aw series has awho serves." a piece -- the decision to enlist offers direction. . opfc, 23 from connecticut playing with his bomb sniffing dog. he was then a few bar fight before his mother jokingly suggested he fight for his country and the next day he enlisted the marine corps. it profiles of other young man who found direction and focus. could that be a focus? guest: of course. i love that stuff. i hear from my students. you wouldn't think that as a service academy you would not have -- which is graduated one. i love this guy to death. he is in the basic of the were the demolition school for seals. he has wanted to be a seal ever since he got direction. lessas kind of thing root kid. he graduated the top 20 or 30 of his class. and it gives direction. absolutely, that can be a reason. but once again, it cannot be curdled, as i say, as milk curdles. it can be curbed by telling these -- guys and gals that they are better -- the civilians are paying for you to become the type of person you want to be. thank civilian. host: and a profile from a lance corporal from frederi
are wondering where the government can cut costs. the npr came up with one idea. >> each day the u.s. treasury mints nearly $2 million in coins. coins that mostly go directly into storage. abc's john karl checked it out. >> reporter: we took a journey to the u.s. mint in philadelphia where they seem to have more doors than "get smart." for a lesson in how the government is losing money by making money. it sounds a little bit like las vegas around here except the coins never stop coming. this is the presidential dollar coin. congress ordered the mint to make millions of them to honor every dead president. but nobody seems to want them. rutherford b. hayes. hot off the press, literally, these coins are still warm. made of manganese brass, they cost nearly 32 cents a pop to make. the mint makes nearly 2 million of them every day. do the math. about $600,000 a day to make them. and each one of these bags, 140,000 coins, $140,000, more than 2,000 pounds. because almost nobody uses these things, most go directly into storage. we found a bunch of them 100 miles down the road in a vault. here at the f
. let's try out this one, a quote from president obama on npr. he said, ronald reagan repeatedly talked about how irresponsible it would be to allow the full faith and credit of the united states to be impaired in any way. what's verdict on that one? >> we rated this one mostly true. we dug into the historical documents and we found reagan did say the u.s. should pay its debts and it should not be in document now, presidents usually support increases to the debt ceiling while congress comp plain it we know that, rated mostly true. >> finally, it one from victoria jackson, she's comedian and tea party supporter. a clause niptd obama care bill, which is now law, gives obama the right to form a private army. what do we make of that? >> this one got the pants on fire. it seemed to be a serious commentary so we took it seriously and checked it. the health care law does expand the public health service, which has a uniformed commission corps, but doctors and nurses, not members of the military no private armies in the health care bill. >> she is a comedian, maybe she was joke, we will give he
experience at npr which happens last year when you were fired. you have done a quick turn around on a book, fantastic book called "muzzled". a great title because you felt like you were muzzled in the situation there. right? >> yeah, you know, something -- again, we're talking about the budget debate this morning and i think you guys are right on target. when you say look, people are talking about -- i've got this plan, i've got that plan. here's my message to the voters. here's this message. say, you know, we don't need competing plans. we need a deal. we need people who are going to talk to each other and offer not only the ability to speak and shout and use bumper sticker slogans but actually listen to each other and then compromise and reach a deal in service to the american people. and what i've had in my experience after i got fired was so many people came up to me and said, you mean because you get nervous at airports when you see people in muslim garb after 9/11, you got fired? you know, i have a similar feeling and the people start to say i can't talk about certain things or some
is the administrator for communications at nasa. mark is the managing editor for digital news at npr. captain mark kelly is an astronaut, shuttle pilot, shuttle commander, and commander of the final mission for endeavour. the only spouse of a member of congress who less traveled into space. he is not just any -- it is kebra a difference. -- gabrielle giffords. [applause] we will skip over the podium for a moment. she is the committee chair who helps to get things going for our committee. we will skip over the speaker. he is the director of the associated press broadcast. he has organized lunches in a short amount of time and we're grateful for his work. lori is the deputy minister later. alain is director in chief of aerospace america. . he is a commentator for russia today. our partners in space. mark is the executive director and a former vice president of communication. he is also a former security assignment editor at abc news. today's newsmaker luncheon is not just about administrator charlie bolton but also about the future of nasa. it is about his vision and some daunting and budgetary real
the debt and, many tea partiers and many americans think we can cut out spending on npr and arts funding and foreign aid and that will take care of the debt problem and that is less than 1% of the budget, you have to cut the programs americans don't touched and the democrats keep swearing, oh, we'll never touch medicare and social security, well then we'll have debts and, deficits as far that's eye can see. >> michelle bachmann said she doesn't think we have to raise the debt ceiling. what are your thoughts. >> i'm very interested in the, because it doesn't make any sense. we have enough revenue coming in from the taxes, month-to-month, week-to-week, to service the national debt and pay social security, and medicare and medicaid. so i don't understand why our rating would go down unless the ratings agencies are trying to suck up to the democrats, on the other hand, i have seen some economists say, yes, it will lower our debt rating and will make -- it doesn't make any sense, because it is the equivalent of, you payer mortgage month-to-month and make those piloavements and you stop buying
's just a clear violation of the law. >> we know your problems with npr and our problems because of that as well. do you think they would even do something like this? >> no, i don't know of any example where they've engaged in that kind -- obviously, they will stigmatize people by, you know, only giving one point of view but here, you have a situation with media matters where if you at all vary from some sort of liberal orthodox, you're in their cross hairs, they attack in a way that is intended to ruin your personal life, ruin your business. it has nothing to do with an honest debate. to me, this is the contrary of everybody who says, you know, we love america. we want to have a debate between left and right. let's get the truth out. here are where you're right on the facts and here's where you're wrong on the facts. that's not what's going on here. people need to understand, this is about ruining people and trying to take a company down to destroy a company. >> right. we'll have you on again. can't wait to talk to you about your new book "muzzled". congratulations on it. talk
, ceo of the aspen institute. senior business editor at npr, and we will skip over our speaker for just a moment, melissa is our fantastic speakers' committee chair and for that we will be eternally grateful. get over our second speaker for a moment, and we have a senior press secretary with the natural resources defense council and the organizer of today's event. we are told there is a vote and we are awaiting another guest of the speaker, congressman brad miller of north carolina. that will add to the drama today, whether he actually makes it to the head table. andrea stone of huffington post , the washington director of reporters without borders and a vital member of our press freedom committee, an editor at large who has been blogging for huffington post since day one. now, please, a larger round of applause for everyone. if there were a king and queen of on-line journalism, our headline duo of guest speakers could be considered candidates or members of the royal family. it is not just another reshaping of aol, but a redefinition of the on-line news business. less than six months la
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)